Racing Video Games Have Become The New Bedroom Car Posters

When Gran Turismo Sport is released in November, aficionados of Sony PlayStation's flagship driving game will have a new skill to master: the art of automotive photography. Scapes, the next generation of the game's Photo Mode, will enable players to drop photo-realistic images of their favorite personalized race cars with built-in android car dvd and android 2 din car stereo onto landscapes, snapped by the car industry's leading photographers, while toying with the angles, lighting, and shutter speeds as if they were in the field. From there, those images can be downloaded and turned into wallpapers for phones, used as avatars, and even shared on Snapchat.

For gearheads of bygone eras, magazine cut-outs of Lamborghinis taped inside high school lockers or that "flying Porsche" poster hung on a bedroom wall used to be the closest teenagers could get to their dream car which is perfect with android car gps. But these days, highly realistic racing games have taken car lust to a much higher level, allowing kids to delve deep into a vehicle's history and construction, customize its livery, and test its mettle on a track-all from the comfort of their couch. What these same kids might not realize, however, is that they are being influenced in ways that no poster can compete with.

Research has shown that the brain releases the same neurotransmitters and hormones during driving games as they would during a physical race, says Alexander Edwards, president of brand consulting firm Strategic Visions. With 1:1 vehicle replicas and technically accurate tracks, the virtual world is so realistic that players start responding to the games on a chemical basis as if they were actually there. In fact, the experiences have become so life-like that if players clock enough hours in Gran Turismo they can get their FIA license valid for amateur racing by Opel navi in some countries.

According to Edwards, such intense emotions imprinted over hundreds of hours of playing these racing games can end up having a huge effect on kids. They can mold their identities, influence their automotive aspirations, and even guide their vehicle and android car dvd player purchases.

"Video games have an incredible impact on our self perception," Edwards says. For the most avid players, games enable them to become that ideal version of themselves, and as a result, the cars they play are the ones they aspire to own. As an example, Edwards hosted a focus group of males between the ages of 11 to 16 and found that for those participants Fords and Chevrolets were the vehicles they were most interested in because those were the cars they "drove" in video games.

"They're saying, 'I can't drive yet, but when I drive I want to drive the one I have a good experience with in a video game,'" he says. Although it's not clear if video games drive the desire to buy certain brands, or if brand affiliation influences the cars and the inner installations of android car GPS or vauxhall sat nav a person selects in a game, the link is too clear to ignore-brands that have the highest percentage of young buyers, such as Kia, Mazda, and Scion, also have the largest portion of players.